Let’s Move to the ‘Burbs

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Many people across the United States have traditionally enjoyed the perks of an urban lifestyle, today though some who live in more populated city limits are beginning to rethink their current neighborhoods. Being in close proximity to everything from the grocery store to local entertainment is  a perk, especially if you can also walk to some of these hot spots and have a short commute to work. The trade-off, however, is that highly populated cities can lack access to open space, a yard, and other desirable features. These are the kinds of things you might miss when spending so much of your time at home. When it comes to social distancing the newest trend seems to be centered around re-evaluating a once-desired city lifestyle and trading it for suburban or rural living.

George Ratiu, Senior Economist at realtor.com notes:

“With the re-opening of the economy scheduled to be cautious, the impact on consumer preferences will likely shift buying behavior…consumers are already looking for larger homes, bigger yards, access to the outdoors and more separation from neighbors. As we move into the recovery stage, these preferences will play an important role in the type of homes consumers will want to buy. They will also play a role in the coming discussions on zoning and urban planning. While higher density has been a hallmark of urban development over the past decade, the pandemic may lead to a re-thinking of space allocation.”

The Harris Poll recently surveyed 2,000 Americans, and 39% of the respondents who live in urban areas indicated the COVID-19 crisis has caused them to consider moving to a less populated area.A Surprising Shift to the ‘Burbs May Be on the Rise | MyKCMThe good news is that if you are considering moving outside the city limits it has become more feasible, especially as Americans have quickly become more accustomed to – and more accepting of – remote work. According to the Pew Research Center, access to the Internet has increased significantly in rural and suburban areas, making working from home easier. Even before the pandemic came into play this year the number of people working from home has spiked considerably.

The take away here is that if you have a home in the suburbs or a rural area, you may start to see an increasing number of buyers looking for a property like yours. If you’re thinking of buying and don’t mind a commute to work for the well-being of your family, you may want to consider looking at homes for sale outside the city. If you are interested in learning about the different suburbs in the Portland metro area message me.  I would love to talk to you about them.

Location and 3 of Portland’s Hottest Hoods

Screen Shot 2019-09-25 at 3.03.14 PMRecently the Portland Business Journal published its Hottest Hoods in Portland for Quarter 2 of 2019.  Three of the top 20 Hottest Hoods in Portland just so happen to be in Beaverton, and are adjacent to my latest listing in the Westbrook Community located in Beaverton.  This got me thinking if you wanted to live in one of those three hot zip codes but could not afford it would you look to the zip code right next door?

The community of Westbrook is a pretty community with lots of wonderful amenities including 2 pools, a community garden and community club house.  Not to mention that the HOA fees take care of water, sewer, garbage, landscaping and care of the common areas, and prices are on average $100K or more less than homes in 97006, 97007 and 97008.

I believe the answer is that yes you should look at the zip codes that are right next door if you cannot afford to purchase or cannot find a home you love in the area you are focusing in on.  If you can save money and still have the conveniences of the hottest zip codes I think it’s a win all around.

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*photos and information courtesy of the Portland Business Journal